Post image for 2 Simple ways to reduce spam complaints

2 Simple ways to reduce spam complaints

by Jeremy Schoemaker on October 31, 2012 · 7 comments

Some of our lead generation clients on the PAR Program have had a bit of a spam issue…   Most of these clients are pumping in thousands of new users a day.   Even though all users double opt in we still have ran into some spam issues.

By just implementing a few small things we have seen complaints reduce to as much as 1/10th of what they were.

First, I would just like to explain why people are reporting  spam.

Every major email service (gmail, hotmail, yahoo, etc) has made the spam button so prevalent that a lot of people use it as the delete button.  Why do they do this?  Well the obvious reason is it helps them score spam… or so they have you believe.  The biggest reason is that email service providers get an enormous amount of fees from services that white list people.  We use these types of services with our PAR Program for all of our clients.

The first trick is to place a non-intrusive disclaimer at the top of every email.

I just want you to know that I have spent an enormous amount of time to put together these emails for you.  If at any time you no longer find them valuable just click here and you will never get email from me again.

See what I did there?   Not only do I give people a VERY easy way to unsubscribe,  I also let them know that I put a lot of effort into crafting these emails.  This lets people know you care and you don’t want to bother them if they do not find them of value.  The wording varies from client to client and you can experiment with this a bit.

The second trick is to make a button or link at the bottom of your emails that says “Is this spam?  Report it!”.

The button would do the exact same thing as the unsubscribe but, it gives the user who feels as if they are being violated to take action against you and report spam!

Again, you will want to play around with the wording.

But, being too careful can cause subscribers to unsubscribe from your newsletter that did not want to. 

One thing we have found is you always have the “law of averages” that people will accidentally click on links that will unsubscribe them from your newsletter.  We first discovered this when people were emailing the site owners asking to be resubscribed to the newsletter.  As surprising as that sounds it’s pretty amazing how many responses there were.

Think about this for a second.  The people that “accidentally” unsubscribed found your newsletter so valuable that they took the time to investigate how to contact you and get resubscribed to your newsletter.

So how do you combat that?

It’s simple!  On your unsubscribe page let the user know you are sad to see them go and that they will never recieve emails from you again.  But, let the user know that if they “hit” unsubscribe by accident the steps on how they can resubscribe.  With the PAR Program we not only give you the flexibility to design this page but, we also do not make people fill out a form again to resubscribe. The user will also resume in the newsletter sequence right where they left off.

I am not sure of any other service that does this but, please go ahead and leave a comment below if you do.

Hopefully these tips help you drastically reduce your spam complaints and keep your newsletter from getting kicked off of email services.

full disclosure

About the author...

– who has written 2858 posts on ShoeMoney.com.

Jeremy "ShoeMoney" Schoemaker is the founder & CEO of the ShoeMoney Blog, Elite Retreat Internet Conference, & the PAR Program. In 2013 Jeremy released his #1 Amazon Best selling Autobiography titled "Nothing's Changed But My Change" - The ShoeMoney Story. Jeremy currently lives in Lincoln Nebraska with his wife and 2 daughters.


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{ 7 comments }

1 Charles

Keep that fire lit!

2 Sam

I’d like to see a pars program vs…

Does it really help knowing all the social details of people who sign up to your newsletter.

How does it help to know you are only sending the “pink blender” newsletter to 20-30 year old females. — what if you’ve just blocked out the boyfriend looking for the perfect gift?

I’d like to see pars vs email marketing with a list of bought email addresses. Just sending the newsletter to 1000 randoms.

And pars vs a traditional “user has signed up to newsletter” list – ie. consented email marketing. So the newsletter is sent to 1000 people who signed up to it – but its just sent using a bcc email to everyone.

Then finally – 1000 emails sent with the par program.

Maybe 1000 isn’t enough to see the results. Maybe more are needed.

But how about it shoe? :)

3 Jeremy Schoemaker

Well…. The PAR Program is not a mass mail system. Its not for purchased leads. Its more of a relationship building system full focused on ROI.

So if your sending email to random people that are not interested then I would not take you as a client.

4 faisal

Nice tips, never though about it.

Some providers make you type your email on the unsubscribe page

5 Trish

Helpful advice. I am actually working on a website that allows you to unsubscribe from all your newsletters/subscriptions in one shot.

6 Joey

Thanks for the tips. I especially like the first one. It’s something simple that everyone can do.

I’ve noticed that a lot of newbies, especially if they are older who aren’t into all this tech stuff don’t know the diff. between unsubscribing to an e-mail vs. reporting and e-mail and what it means.

Some of my subscribers write me and ask me “How did I get on this list” — even though I use a double opt-in form, and they just subscribed days earlier.

I used to think people were joking. Now, I just shake my head, reply back, and explain to them how the process works.

They write me back in shock saying that they couldn’t believe I that I wrote them back and that I’m a real person…ha, ha, ha.

It’s moments like those that make me realize how lost many people looking to get into this are. It still kind of surprises me, but I’ve learned to stop comparing them to my grandmother.

My grandmother is about to be 81 in a month, still lives on her own, drives –totally self-sufficient — and with her mental faculties in tact. She’s also really into Facebook — way more than I am at 32!

7 Sam - Bisnis Internet

I love the part when people want to resubscribe, they don’t have to do the “all over again” routine, so I’m assuming that you don’t delete unsubcribed email addresses for some period of time?

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